The Truth About Bikinis

I know with the cold weather in many places, most people aren’t thinking about swimsuits yet. However, the summer season will soon be upon us, and suits are on the racks of many retail stores already.

Below is a refreshing viewpoint on swimsuits and modesty from a thinking young lady who took matters into her own hands when she had a difficult time finding a suit to suit her 🙂

The Godly Truth About Bikinis – FINALLY Someone Gets It!

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Don’t Ever Use the Word “Gifted”

Gifted Children @ Three Cornered Hug

I’ve seen a lot of posts lately about gifted children. These have ranged from complaints that the public schools can’t handle them, to comments on how teachers think you’re saying your child is “better”, to parents who want people to wake up and realize that every child is gifted. While all of these have elements of truth to them, when I hear this word, I’ve a completely different thought. Grandma.

If you’ve read my blog regularly, you may know that my paternal grandmother was a retired teacher who fully supported my homeschooling endeavors. At an early age, she recognized that my son was extremely bright. And although we were both excited at the opportunities that homeschooling offers for such a child, she gave me one piece of advice that I’ll never forget: “Sarah, never use the word ‘gifted’ in front of him”.

I didn’t ask her what she meant, but have followed her directions to this day.

Now this is the place that I could go on forever with commentary about my thoughts on this subject, but I think I will leave you to ponder this statement, the ramifications of using such a word, or whether it matters at all…just as she allowed me to do.

You NEED this compass

You know those irritating compasses? The ones that are half eye-stabber, half pencil, and 100% irritating? The ones that somehow keep getting bigger as you use them, so instead of making a nice circle, you wind up with a drawing of a snail?

Well, leave your snails behind and get this great SAFE-T compass. While it’s not perfect, we’ve found it to be SOOOOOOOO much better than your average math tool. At this cheap price (just over a buck+shipping), you can’t lose!

Find it here.

SAFE-T Compass @ Three Corneered Hug

We Skip School

…and you should too.

Three Cornered Hug“We’ve been wondering, do you guys get snow days?”, asked our next door neighbor. “No, we take “sun” days.”

We’ve often surprised people with our year-round school schedule. Snowy days–we do play outside. BUT we also do school. There’s no reason not to. Summer days are the same way. Remember those long, boring dog days of summer? We don’t have those. Yes, we go swimming and do theme parks. BUT we also do school. That’s how we fill up the rest of the time when our friends are on vacation, etc.

So, do we ever take time off? Absolutely. You know those wonderful, sun-shiny days, when the temperature is just right? When the smell of the fresh air is intoxicating, and your eyes keep wandering toward the window? That’s when we call up some friends and run away to the park or go hiking. WE SKIP SCHOOL.

There have been other times as well. One beautiful fall, we just randomly took a week off and ran away to Chicago to visit my Aunt. (However, I guess going to the Museum of Science and Industry or visiting Chinatown would qualify for educational experiences.) When my husband has the chance to go somewhere cool for work- we go too. (Again, arguably still school.) When my mom had surgery and needed help, when my sister was in a car accident- WE SKIPPED SCHOOL.

That’s the great thing about homeschooling, the great thing about doing school the way we do: a flexible schedule. There’s such a freedom in it. We can take off and not sweat it. Do I want my child to know that learning is important? YES. However, I also want him to know that enjoying life is equally important. I want him to realize that there’s more to know than what can be learned inside of four walls.

Picky Eaters & Persimmons OR How to NOT Raise a Picky Eater

Picky eating @ Three Cornered HugAs a child, I was a horribly picky eater, and so thin…food struggles were pretty regular around my house. Fortunately, I was still exposed to a lot of different kinds of food, having so many multicultural friends and experiences, and as an adult I’m not so picky.

Still, I determined to try to change that for my son, and I am blessed to have a child that will try pretty much anything. While some of that has to be genetic (from Dad), I’d like to think some of my crazy methods worked:)

And so, without further ado, let’s get down to business!

1. From day one, let your child determine when they’re hungry and when they’re done eating. Now please understand I do think it’s wise to offer a child milk, and later, food at regular times. However, if they’re not hungry don’t force it. Note that I am not an advocate of allowing a child to skip meals only to eat junky snacks later. If my son didn’t have much breakfast when he was younger, for instance, I’d save his food for later or pack some healthy food if we were going out. Also, some parents try to push their kids to eat– but really, when’s the last time you heard of a normal child starving themselves to death?

2. Starting when your child is very young (if you still can), try to keep a lot of variety in your diet, and encourage your child to try it all with you. Don’t make a big deal about it, just serve it on their plates with everything else. Remember, sometimes it takes several exposures to a food before a child will try or like it.

3. Early on, institute a “try one bite rule”, and stick to it with a no nonsense attitude as if there was no other option. I do not condone trying to force a child to eat any more than that, however.

4. Make trying new foods like an adventure. Many times, we like to pick up something new and strange when we go to the grocery store. Here we have a neat store called Sprouts, where we can score good deals on a large variety of fruits and veggies. One day my mom was incredulous over the phone as I told her I was looking up how to serve persimmons. “You mean you bought them and you don’t even know what to do with them?” Yep, that’s just what we do. Buy first, then figure it out. I had never seen persimmons sold in the other 2 states we’ve lived in and we were curious. Delicious!!!

5. Try foods from other cultures. Okay, this one actually rides the coattails of the last one, but it was getting a little long. We’ve made excursions to Asian or Mexican grocery stores for years. You will see some wild things there (or they might seem wild to you if you are a US native), so for young kids it best to try to stick to certain kinds of foods to start. In fact, I guess I would mostly recommend sweets (even though I’m usually NOT really big on giving kids sweets) so your child gets a nice first impression. One such food is ice cream Mochi. Basically, these are little ice cream balls wrapped up in sweet rice flour dough. Yum! (there’s also a more traditional sort filled with bean curd, but try the ice cream first). Botan are little square candies made from sweet rice flour, and they’re so cool! You take off an outer wrapper and there’s another wrapper underneath made of rice that dissolves in your mouth. Kids think that’s pretty neat. Pocky are little cookie sticks dipped in chocolate or strawberry flavored goodness. If you want something less sweet, you might follow this recipe for Russian blini’s (like crepes), or you can pick up some Polish pierogi’s (dumplings filled with mashed potatoes, usually) at the regular grocery store in the freezer section.